Kokomo Tribune; Kokomo, Indiana

August 26, 2013

Library announces fall book discussion groups


Kokomo Tribune

---- — Kokomo-Howard County Public Library is calling all bibliophiles to rediscover a classic book or discover a new favorite by joining other book lovers for discussions at the library.

Copies of each of the following books are available one month prior to discussion. Contact your favorite library location to register. There will be no December book discussion.

Main Branch in Meeting Room A:

• 10 a.m. Sept. 11, “Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President,” by Candice Millard. New York Times bestselling account explains James Garfield’s rise from poverty to the American presidency, and the dramatic history of his assassination and legacy.

• 10 a.m. Oct. 9, “The Buddha in the Attic,” by Julie Otsuka. The story is told of a group of young women brought from Japan to San Francisco as mail-order brides in the 1920s. It traces their lives from the journey across the ocean to their arrival in San Francisco, and from raising children who would later reject the Japanese culture and language to the arrival of World War II.

• 10 a.m. Nov. 13, “The Night Circus,” by Erin Morgenstern. The circus, Le Cirque des Rêves, arrives without warning. And it’s only open at night. Behind the scenes of the big top, a fierce competition is underway between young magicians Celia and Marco. In this game, only one can be left standing.

South Branch in the Tulip Tree Room:

• 6:30 p.m. Sept. 19, “The Language of Flowers,” by Vanessa Diffenbaugh. Romantic expressions are conveyed through the Victorian language of flowers, except for Victoria Jones. Growing up in foster care, she’s accustomed to mistrust, not romance. Grown and on her own, she realizes her gift for helping others through the flowers she chooses. A stranger makes her question her life and forces her to confront her secretive past, but it might just give her a chance at happiness.

• 6:30 p.m. Oct. 17, “The Age of Innocence,” by Edith Wharton. The book studies of the rigid requirements of New York high society in the late 19th century and its effect on three people’s lives.

• 6:30 p.m. Nov. 21, “The Fault in Our Stars,” by John Green. Hazel is 16 with terminal cancer when she meets Augustus in a cancer support group. The two share an irreverent sense of humor and immense charm as they wonder, “Does my life, and will my death, have meaning?”

Russiaville Branch in the Meeting Room:

• 10:30 a.m. Sept. 6, “The Night Circus,” by Erin Morgenstern. The circus, Le Cirque des Rêves, arrives without warning. And it’s only open at night. Behind the scenes of the big top, a fierce competition is underway between young magicians Celia and Marco. In this game, only one can be left standing.

• 10:30 a.m. Oct. 4, “In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin,” by Erik Larson. A mild-mannered professor from Chicago, William E. Dodd, becomes America’s first ambassador to Hitler’s Nazi Germany in 1933, and takes his wife, son and daughter with him to Europe. At first, the family, especially the daughter Martha, is excited and intrigued. But as Hitler’s slaughter of the Jews grows, they realize just how evil he is, but by then Europe is awash in terror and blood.

• 10:30 a.m. Nov. 1, “Call the Midwife: A True Story Of The East End In The 1950s,” by Jennifer Worth. Jennifer Worth came from a sheltered background when she became a midwife in the Docklands in the East End in the 1950s. Attached to an order of nuns who had been working in the slums since the 1870s, Jennifer tells the story about not only the women she treated, but also the community of nuns and the camaraderie of the midwives with whom she trained.