Kokomo Tribune; Kokomo, Indiana

August 1, 2013

Aug. 1, 2013: Letters to the editor


Kokomo Tribune

---- — 4 percent of whom do headlines refer?

Recent articles in The Indianapolis Star, as well as other papers around the state, have stated that only 4 percent of Ivy Tech students complete their degree. Are we talking about 4 percent of the Ivy Tech students that have no children or grandchildren they are raising? Are we talking about 4 percent of the students who don’t work a full-time job? How about the ones who aren’t already degree-holders just taking a few classes, or the 4 percent who are enrolled at another institution who only need one or two courses at Ivy Tech? Are they part of the 4 percent?

While stating a claim like “only 4 percent graduate” may be good for headlines, it surely doesn’t describe the tremendous amount of value that Ivy Tech provides to the most diverse student body in the state. One of our state’s most famous lawyers has a spouse who goes to Ivy Tech. One nationally recognized, award-winning recording artist is also a student. I took classes with aspiring med students who were also enrolled at IUPUI. I also bumped into a friend who was working on her MPA. None of these people will graduate with an Ivy Tech degree. Are they part of the 4 percent success rate, or the 96 percent reported failure rate?

This year I was accepted into the University of Pennsylvania. If I had applied directly to Penn without ever attending Ivy Tech, they wouldn’t have even looked my way. Because I returned to the classroom as a student of Ivy Tech, I was able to earn a GPA that turned the heads of Harvard, Yale, University of Columbia and over 400 other institutions. Yes, my education at Ivy Tech was not just a short-sighted cheap education solution. Ivy Tech made my ascent to the Ivy League possible.

Count me a part of the 4 percent or whatever percent you want, just don’t count me or the thousands of others who found their way through the doors of Ivy Tech, a failure.

Casey Bridgeford

Philadelphia

‘Hopefully some of my relatives will see’

I was born in Kokomo and started grade school there. Not long afterwards, my father lost his job so my parents decided to move.

While we were moving, we had a bad auto accident, and both my parents were killed.

The hospital contacted some of my relatives, but they would not accept me. So after I recovered, the state placed me in a group home until I was adopted or turned of age.

I was never adopted, so when I turned 18 I started out on my own.

As luck would have it, I got mixed up with the wrong crowd and got into some trouble. Now I am in prison in Alabama.

Editor, I know I still have relatives living in or around Kokomo, and I’d be very grateful to you if you would be kind enough to print my letter in your newspaper. Hopefully, some of my relatives will see my name and remember me.

I truly want to hear from them, or if anyone just wanted to write me, I’d surely write them because I have no one. My address is 100 Warrior Lane, Bessemer, AL 35023.

Thank you very much for your help.

Michael Schumacher

Bessemer, Ala.

These wonderful industrial turbines

The serenity of the countryside is one of the main reasons why we moved here. The other reason was the Tipton County taxes.

At the first couple of meetings I went to this year, I asked: What is this rush to go forward when we have a perfect example of an industrial wind farm right here? Study it. See how the wind company follows up on its promises.

So far the county has done the road repairs! Some people still don’t have phone or TV reception! The mixture of whatever dust is on the roads is bothering the residents’ health, and no dust control has been done! More than 100 complaints have been filed, and now the commissioners are saying they need $25,000 for an employee to help with the complaints.

No one even knew who receives the complaints from the Windfall residents and how to follow through with them. They already hired someone to help with their money problems and to get the books straightened out. What happened there? Have you read the Kokomo Tribune lately?

The commissioners decided the neighbors did not have to be notified of a hearing concerning any kind of request of a neighbor and what they wanted to do with their land when it required a zoning change. Most people didn’t know about this until this year, and we are fighting for our homes

A Realtor friend asked if we would consider selling, but when she found out the “possibility” of industrial wind turbines might go up in our area, her company isn’t showing anyone in those possible areas. Thank you, commissioners.

I ask besides waiting to see how the Wildcat (Industrial) Wind Farm does, shouldn’t its new taxes come in this year? Surely it is being taxed as an industrial farm. This should be a boost to taxes. Will the Assessor’s Office need extra money for help figuring up next year’s taxes and so on if the industrial wind turbines pass? Surely all these things were considered before a judgment was made.

Serena Melton

Sharpsville