Kokomo Tribune; Kokomo, Indiana

October 6, 2013

Oct. 6, 2013: Letters to the editor


Kokomo Tribune

---- — Minimum wage is a mentoring wage

I believe the Kokomo Tribune night editor is a fine writer. However, I strongly disagree with his opinion concerning minimum wage.

Minimum wage was never intended to be a family wage. It was established as a mentoring wage for high school and college students.

I had three individuals whom I worked for when I was younger. They taught me more about how to be successful in life than I learned in high school and college. These individuals were honest, friendly and always provided great service.

These people, when talking to me, covered every detail right down to, “If you are chewing gum when talking to a customer or client, your IQ appears to be significantly lower.” That is just one of the many things I learned while working my minimum wage-paying jobs.

The problem with so many left-leaning people today is they think the government is the answer. Maybe we should, according to those who think in that manner, establish a minimum wage for those starting out and know nothing, a medium wage for those in transition, a maximum wage for those who have developed a skill, then the ultimate wage where you become president or serve in Congress with perks, like not having to take Obamacare.

People need to learn that no one owes you anything. Your level of income, by way of a job, a profession or being a business owner, is a result of the education, skill and work ethic you display. I do not believe education alone (though you should educate yourself all through life) will guarantee you a good job. Some of the most educated people I know have no common sense.

We are shopping colleges at this moment for my daughters. The reason I bring this up is because I want them to have an education.

However, I would rather my girls serve under a mentor with values than have them taught by a liberal professor trying to brainwash them with his doctrine. (Not all college professors are liberal. The survey numbers say 80 percent.)

Jim Richardson

Sharpsville

Rokita doesn’t listen to Hoosiers anymore

Who’s Todd Rokita? Our congressman? He never comes around here. If you don’t have the latest technology, you can’t even get in touch with him.

Besides, he doesn’t listen to the people in Indiana anymore. He listens to that “weirdo” senator from Texas.

Now Mr. Rokita has decided to shut down the government, all because some Canadian transplant has told him to.

There goes all the benefits for the poor. Doesn’t matter. He already has attacked Social Security, food stamps and every other program that helps the poor and the middle class.

His party has taken away our union rights in Indiana.

And, he depends on lack of knowledge to hold his office, like Obama wasn’t born here or is from Kenya.

Call Rokita’s office, and they lie right to your face. If they dump the debt ceiling, he says it won’t affect social programs. Doesn’t he understand how the federal budget works?

Rokita’s dumping on senior citizens and the middle class, and he’s lying to you Hoosiers about the Affordable Care Act.

Vote union. Vote choice. Vote freedom. Vote Democrat.

Tony Shell

Kokomo

Electorate must take charge of Congress

On Oct. 1, President Obama’s Affordable Health Care Act took effect. In skimming over the high points, one begins to question just how affordable it actually is.

These high points are a bit too numerous to go into in this limited space, but they are there for anybody to research. One telling aspect is the haste with which President Obama and his Democrat cronies are exhibiting to achieve their ends. Which brings us to the next point: Congress and the electorate.

The time appears to have arrived for the electorate to take charge of Congress by implementing a complete housecleaning. This could be a long, drawn out process, so I advise taking it in small steps.

Since Obamacare is the current issue, the first step ought to be to put all legislators’ health care on an equal footing with the rest of us in terms of coverage and how it is paid for.

Also, the so-called Affordable Health Care Act should be reviewed closely to determine just how affordable it truly is. Personally, I have my doubts.

Kenneth Crockett

Kokomo