Kokomo Tribune; Kokomo, Indiana

June 16, 2013

June 16, 2013: Letters to the editor


Kokomo Tribune

---- — ‘CAVE’ residentstilt at windmills

Like Don Quixote, the CRB is looking at the windmill as an evil enemy to be smitten and driven from the land.

The problem is CRB members are not being responsible. If they were so concerned, they would disconnect from the power grid, freeing the planet from the oil, coal, natural gas, non-renewable energy and the pollution that electric generation produces.

Wind is abundant, non-polluting and is generated by the atmosphere. At this time only solar is also a non-polluting source, but Indiana only produces about 4.5 hours of sun per day on average compared to wind, so solar is at the present too expensive.

Opponents claim windmills are only profitable because of tax subsidies, but they say nothing of the billions we give Big Oil every year. In the United States, credible estimates of annual fossil fuel subsidies range from $10 billion to $52 billion annually, while even efforts to remove small portions of those subsidies have been defeated in Congress.

Opponents claim health issues from multiple issues with windmills, but an independent expert panel established by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Public Health gave wind a clean bill of health in January 2012, based on analyzing all available scientific studies. The agencies reported: “There is no evidence for a set of health effects from exposure to wind turbines that could be characterized as a ‘Wind Turbine Syndrome’. We conclude the weight of the evidence suggests no association between noise from wind turbines and measures of psychological distress or mental health problems.”

Why is it that people who are against something always find “facts,” true or otherwise, spend hours looking for the bad but never suggest alternatives, never considering if it helps others or the planet? Windmills are not the cure-all for all our energy needs but are ahead of everything else now.

Elected officials should not cower to a vocal minority who enjoy being “CAVE” (citizens against virtually everything) residents (thank you, Mayor Goodnight). If you want to stop windmills, make trash to electricity viable. Oh, wait, that will stink. Make changing animal waste into electricity affordable, as you all seem to want the rural landscape preserved.

We all have to live on this planet, and I would prefer to not have to wear a breathing mask while I am doing it.

J. Fred Pettijohn

Kokomo

What if no one bought gas 1 day?

Isn’t it amazing that every week you can count on gas going up 10 to 40 cents a gallon? They have started to vary the days, but the end result is still the same: The consumer eats the bear.

If the gas companies weren’t declaring such huge profits, it would be funny.

It would be sweet if just one day no one would buy gas, just to show the companies we can do without their product. Might make them think about us instead of profit.

John Hurst

Kokomo

Keep children safein mowing season

Recently, a 2-year-old Florida girl lost her feet when her father backed over her with the riding lawn mower. We read about many such accidents during the mowing season. These accidents can be avoided by following these safety tips.

Be sure the yard is free from objects that could become projectiles. Objects can travel up to 200 mph after leaving the discharge chute. The discharge chute is equipped with a protective guard or deflector to stop objects from becoming projectiles. The deflector should always be in place.

Do not mow in an area where young children are playing. They may not understand the dangers of the mower, and the operator may not be able to hear them approaching the machine. Always look behind the mower before backing up. A small child can easily be hidden by the mower.

Do not allow extra riders on a mower, even if you are not mowing. A child can fall off the mower when being held on a lap. I have witnessed a child being held on a lap while riding on a mower being driven along a busy country road. Not only could the child have fallen off, but the mower could have been hit by another vehicle. A person would not operate a vehicle without first placing the child in a safety seat, but this practice is forgotten when operating a riding mower.

Never leave a running mower unattended.

By following these rules, we can keep our children safe during the mowing season.

Iris Eller

Kokomo