Kokomo Tribune; Kokomo, Indiana

December 25, 2012

Let’s keep the sparkle


The issue: The Christmas spirit.

Our view: If only we could

carry it throughout the year, the world surely would be a better place.

It’s the day after Christmas, and we’re already nostalgic for the holiday.

We dropped a handful of coins into a familiar red kettle. We dropped off a sack of groceries at the food pantry or the local shelter. We bought a selection of gifts for a child we’d never met.

And though we might’ve gotten a little crazy trying to keep everyone happy, we reminded ourselves that it is, indeed, a season to be jolly. We put on a smile and joined in singing everyone’s favorite Christmas carols.

It wasn’t always like this.

The church did not celebrate the birth of Jesus until Telesphorus, the second bishop of Rome, declared in the second century that church services should be held to celebrate “The Nativity of our Lord and Saviour.”

Even then, the celebrations weren’t always held in December. It wasn’t until 320 A.D. that Pope Julius I specified Dec. 25 as the official date of the birth of Jesus Christ, and even then, some early Christians resisted joining in the festivities because they fell in the midst of a pagan celebration of the winter solstice.

In its early form, the celebration was a festival more like Mardi Gras. In fact, the events became so raucous in the England of the Middle Ages that Puritan reformers actually banned celebration of the holiday.

That ban carried over to some parts of the English colonies, and from 1659 to 1681, anyone caught celebrating Christmas in Boston could be fined 5 shillings.

Thus, Christmas wasn’t a holiday in early America. In fact, Congress was in session on Dec. 25, 1789, the nation’s first Christmas under its new Constitution.

In the 19th century, inspired first by Washington Irving and then by Charles Dickens, Americans began to build a tradition of celebrating Christmas as a family holiday.

In 1860, American illustrator Thomas Nast borrowed from the European stories of St. Nicholas, patron saint of children, in creating Father Christmas, a forerunner of Santa Claus. Ten years later, Christmas became a federal holiday.

The holiday celebrates the best America has to offer. Family. Peace on earth and goodwill toward men. A spirit of generosity.

If only we could carry the spirit of this season throughout the year, the world surely would be a better place.