Kokomo Tribune; Kokomo, Indiana

June 14, 2013

Letters to the Editor: June 14, 2013


Kokomo Tribune

---- — County now wants young people?

As part of the new Tipton County Contradictory Plan of the future, county officials are seeking to attract and retain young people to ease population decline. Tipton officials’ answer to steady population decline is blanketing the entire county with industrial wind turbines.

I realize that younger generations are being indoctrinated to believe that wind turbines are fun, friendly and green, so perhaps the county’s solution may just work. I must respectfully disagree, as it’s completely laughable.

At most of the recent Tipton County government meetings, I find myself being one of the youngest people in the audience. I moved into my home in Prairie Township on Halloween in 2011. My neighbors have all been welcoming and more than polite. I like where I live. However, as a member of a younger generation, I honestly never would have bought my home in Tipton County had I known about the excessive commitment to wind turbines that my current government officials desire.

Tipton County wants young people, but only in certain areas. When all of the industrial turbines are placed, young people moving here will most likely have to inhabit the downtown areas of Tipton, Sharpsville, Windfall or Kempton. I’m not sure how many young people will be beating down the door to reside in downtown Tipton. So they can eat at the Jim Dandy?

When the young families do move to Tipton County, there will be trails to walk and bike along for up-close-and-personal views of industrial wind turbines. Perhaps our children can be granted tax abatements to sell lemonade on the side of these trails to out-of-towners just wanting a glimpse of our monuments. Like the Roman Empire, our turbines would convey power and wealth. At night, the whole county will become a fascinating red-light district, promoting even more excitement. There really will be nothing quite like the sound of a loud whoosh underneath hundreds of red-flashing lights on a beautiful July night. Who needs fireworks?

If you are considering a move to Tipton County, it might be worthwhile to note there is a definite pecking order. It appears the more land you own, the more power you have. So young people just starting a family, breathing life into the community, take note: While you are indeed needed to keep the county alive, your little acre of land affords you no say in what happens in Tipton County. But the view ... the view will be worth it! Who cares if you don’t get a say in the decisions that affect your everyday life, that affect the lives of your children.

Knowing that Tipton County officials are diligently working on a plan to promote the safety and well-being of its citizens is most comforting. I’m just afraid, with all the people who will want to live here, we just may need that roundabout in 10 years. We all should be grateful that German wind companies can give us our tax money back in the form of a ridiculous wind farm.

John Pope, Sharpsville

 

Government needs to communicate

The citizens must demand more from local government, which is only willing to do the minimum communication. Wind energy companies capitalize on officials and their families and friends, poised to profit from zoning that supports wind company business objectives.

CRD sent a notice to each and every household, alerting citizens to conspiring that has been going on for years. Why do we have to rely on a private citizens group to perform communication regarding such a dramatic change in environment and landscape within the county? I’ll tell you why. The local government is representing leaseholders.

David Barnard, Tipton

 

Lead by example, turbine proponents

It really irks me when I see pro-wind articles written by people who say they were born and raised in Tipton County, but they neglect to say they don’t live there now! When you do some research, you’ll see that they own large parcels of farmland in Tipton County, and they are leaseholders of industrial wind turbines.

Furthermore, they neglect to say they are receiving large sums of money from the wind farms subsidized by federal, state and local governments. But it is all right for non-participating landowners to be collateral damage, suffering from losses of property value, health, TV/Internet/cellphone reception, and rural environment. And, they are forced to look at these ugly, 500-foot tall turbines and endure the sounds of these mechanical monsters 24/7.

You won’t find the aforementioned wind farm proponents volunteering to lead by example and live in the footprint of a wind farm!

Darrell Pennycoff, Sharpsville