Kokomo Tribune; Kokomo, Indiana

December 8, 2012

Day: Our lives are good but tough

By Ray Day
Guest columnist

— There are many things each of us does not know. Most are content just living day by day, and all things outside of that life are not needed to better themselves.

But as I grow older, I find myself wanting to learn more. I start a new book or just ask questions of those who know. Many times, I start up my old computer and just start asking questions and get a lot of answers from it.

The ones on the other end often do not know anymore than I do, and they refer me to different websites where I can find the answers.

But I am not content to take that answer as gospel. It could just be another’s opinion and not the facts. A lot can be learned about many things, but don’t rely on one person’s answer.

My morning starts the same each day. I get my coffee and my Kokomo Tribune, and I spend about an hour reading just about all of it before stopping long enough to get my daily chores started.

Putting the information from the newspaper to use is what I try to do by making notes to check later, either on the television or by checking with others before that is placed up into my memory bank for later use.

I learned a long time ago that many things you hear are just gossip and not the whole truth. Even good friends can give you the wrong information.

They put their own wording to it. They don’t do it intentionally, but they believe it must be said before they forget what it was all about.

Using the mind for remembering gets a little heavy once in a while, and some of those things you thought you knew just aren’t there anymore. The brain gets a little tired and feels like it has all it can handle without adding to it.

But the brain is a wonderful asset to everything we do or say, and many get the illness that dulls the brain to the point that we don’t even know our own family. Once a good friend had to put his father into a nursing home because he was getting old and fell a lot. Wanting to keep his dad from getting hurt, he did what he hated to do but it was for the health of his father.

He went in one day to see his father. The older man looked at my friend and said, “Do I know you? Who are you?”

The son said that broke his heart. His father had played a part in my friend taking up the ministry, as the father was a minister too.

Another old friend told me one day he visited his wife every day at a nursing home, and he had to constantly tell her to breathe. He said that it hurt him very much to have to holler at her because they had been married for more than 50 years.

We never know when that will happen to us or to one of our loved ones or friends. I guess we take life for granted. We expect to be able to live without problems, but it just does not work that way.

Life is what you make of it, but sometimes the making is a taking.

Maybe one day, they will find out what causes that brain degeneration. Maybe those affected will live a full life and remember all the things they did and all those wonderful members of their families.

I guess I should be tickled pink to be able to remember the things I do. But I think what helps me is that I read as much as I can, watch news shows, and that I am always ready to listen to others who lived before me and still knew what things were like in their day.

That is why I write this column. It keeps me alert and happy.

Ray “Uncle Ray” Day is a weekly contributor to the Kokomo Tribune. Contact him at uncleray@earthlink.net.