George Kingston

Hailing from Michigan and boasting iconic automobile manufacturer Henry Ford among his friends, George Kingston made his way to Kokomo in 1900, where he worked as a pattern marker for the Ford and Donnelly Foundry.

Already possessing a wealth of knowledge and creative spunk, Kingston took what he learned at the foundry, which is credited with creating the first aluminum casting in 1895, and applied it to the automotive world.

After tinkering with new ideas at the foundry, in 1902 he developed the Kingston carburetor, and a year later, with financial backing from Charles Byrne and James Ryan, created the Byrne and Kingston Company, which began to mass produce carburetors for Ford’s Model T, as well as an assortment of other automotive devices.

It quickly grew into one of the world’s largest producers of carburetors and eventually merged with Kokomo Brass and Kokomo Electric to create Kingston Products. The company operated in Kokomo until 1989.

Kingston’s industry innovations made him a wealthy man, and in 1914, he purchased the Seiberling Mansion as his family’s residence. The family sold the Seiberling to Indiana University after Kingston’s death in 1946.

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