David W. Turner of Kokomo sends this Jeer for slow police responses:

"Thank you for your article by George Myers concerning political claims about crime, roads and a Chicago influx. I found myself in agreement on some statements and conclusions and in disagreement on other assessments.

"But what I did not find was any discussion in the crime section of the article concerning response time or success rate. It is not only a matter of how many more or less crime reports we are having, but importantly how are we responding and what is our performance solving criminal acts? The article offered no facts or information on these key measures.

"I only have the facts on a single case, and it is concerning. This fall my wife's purse was stolen from her in a local shopping center's parking lot. The event was witnessed by two other people. The thief quickly boarded a van driven by an accomplice. The van was visually followed as it exited onto Markland Avenue, but in the confusion no one obtained the license plate number.

"A witness had a phone and called 911. The store was then alerted. A security employee phoned the dispatch center. My wife and the witnesses then stood in the parking lot for move than a half-hour until a police officer arrived. It's not the same, but if your house was burning, how would you like it if no one showed up for more than a half-hour?

"To make matters worse, my wife mentioned to one of the witnesses that her cellphone was in her purse. Out came the other lady's phone. 'What's your number? I'll try to trace it.' While we waited for the police, the purse in the van was tracked going north on the U.S. 31 bypass. It continued north on 31 until it reached Indiana 18 and pulled into the McClure gas station. Still no one to tell what was happening. Yes, later we learned the thieves stopped to buy $140 in cigarettes.

"As we continued to wait, the van proceeded north to the BP station just south of Grissom. Yes, it was time to make some more purchases. A person just might need $50 in lottery tickets and $100 in prepaid gas cards. That was the last of the tracking. The thieves found the phone and turned it off.

"All this happened and the police had still not responded. Had they arrived earlier, it might have been possible for them to contact the state police or the Peru Police Department to try to get someone on the scene.

"The case is still open, but the tentative score is Solved Crime 0-Unsolved Crime 1."

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