Calbert Cheaney

HOOSIER: Indiana's Calbert Cheaney, left, drives around Xavier's Tyrice Walker during an NCAA Tournament game on March 21, 1993, at the Hoosier Dome in Indianapolis. Indiana advanced to the round of 16 with a 73-70 win behind Cheaney's 23 points.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Former Indiana star Calbert Cheaney, former Purdue star Terry Dischinger and former Valparaiso coach Homer Drew are part of the 2019 class selected Tuesday for the College Basketball Hall of Fame.

Joining them during the induction ceremony this November are four other former playters — Duke's Shane Battier, Ernie DiGregorio of Providence, UNLV's Larry Johnson and Stanford's Todd Lichti — and former coaches Lute Olson and Rick Majerus.

Cheaney’s 2,613 career points from 1989-93 still stand as the most in IU and Big Ten history. The three-time All-American led the Hoosiers to two Big Ten titles and a run to the 1992 Final Four. He averaged 22.4 points and 6.2 rebounds per game en route to earning Big Ten and National Player of the Year honors as a senior in 1993. He was selected No. 6 overall in the 1993 NBA Draft and went on to play 13 professional seasons.

Dischinger is one of Purdue's all-time greats. From 1959-62, he averaged 28.3 points per game — the third-highest average in program history — and a school-record 13.7 rebounds per game. He was a second-team All-American as a sophomore and consensus first-team All-American as a junior and senior. He was a member of the 1960 gold medal USA Basketball team and went on to win the NBA Rookie of the Year award in 1963 and make three NBA All-Star teams.

Drew was a fixture on the Valpo sidelines for more than two decades, leading the Crusaders to 371 victories and nine postseason appearances. He ended his career, which also included stints at Bethel and IU-South Bend, with 640 career victories over 34 seasons overall. The nine postseason appearances included seven trips to the NCAA Tournament, highlighted by Valpo’s run to the Sweet 16 in 1998.

Majerus, who died in 2012, won 517 games at Marquette, Ball State, Utah and Saint Louis. He was best known for his time with the Utes, leading them to the national championship game in 1998.

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